S6E2: Capitalize your Finances with Chris Panagiotu

“Exposure to financial planning at an early age gives people an edge on their finances that can open their minds in understating numbers in the future.” Chris Panagiotu

Chris is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER Professional and a Certified and Chartered Retirement Plans SpecialistSM (CRPS®, conferred by College for Financial Planning). In addition, he holds the following licenses with LPL Financial: series 7 and series 66. In 2020, Chris was recognized as a Five Star Wealth Manager* by the Seattle Times.

Outside the office, Chris hosts the podcast “CAPitalize” (available on Spotify), roots for his Oregon Ducks, and, most importantly, loves spending time with his wife, Stephanie. He gives thanks to God for every blessing that comes his way.

Christopher, the CAP in CAPitalize, investment journey began when he was ten years old. Over the years, he has grown his business by going beyond just having clients and investing in the same platforms he recommends to his clients.

Chris learned that in the journey of being a financial planner, personal touch when dealing with your clients is better. Please get to know your clients before engaging them on their needs. In most cases, the planning process is usually in reverse. According to Chris, you start with the market and the trends before you understand the client’s needs since, in most cases, the clients also do not know what they need in investment.

Simple language that every person can understand is the key to getting more clients, retaining your clients, and getting referrals for your business. Chris is big on understanding his client’s passion, which makes him want the best for his clients and the outcomes they can receive.

S6E1: Milk Carton Musings and Leadership with Nick Lozano

“As much as we need technical skills in the business world, soft skills are even more important.” Nick Lozano

Today’s guest is Nick Lozano who is a technology professional who has a love for digital media. He co-hosts a podcast called >Lead.exe, which is for anyone who wants to level up their leadership skills and enhance their careers. ​ As someone in Tech, you need soft skills because you will have to sell yourself and the business to your clients and potential prospects. So much as we need technical skills in the business world, softer skills are even more critical.

During the initial talks about Tech, Nick brings about the analogy of building a house; you can make it as high as you need to go, as big as you want, or it can be a simple one-room house and still be great. The complex sides of technology can be a headache, especially for someone outside the industry. Nick’s soft skills make it easier to understand the technical side of technology in a fun way.

The audience you present to will determine how you will do your presentation for your message to go through. This is even more so when you have a paid sponsorship and must make the audience get the news across. Sometimes being simple and precise works better than using jargon.

Making mistakes is part of the process, and I know there is room for failure, but the lowest point is if you fail once, learn from it; this is how you gain experience. The downside is that if you are making mistakes and you aren’t learning from them, you are wasting your time and energy. Be prepared for how you will receive feedback, which will broaden your perspective on issues. All feedback is there to build you; the good and the bad appreciate everyone who will give it to you.

Nick humorously shares his story and experiences making this a unique and fantastic interview to begin the year.

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S5E37: Return on Ingredients and the Restaurant Institute with Mark Kelnhofer

“Cost structure is a process; it’s about applying managerial cost concepts to the restaurant industry.” Mark Kelnhofer

My guest is Mark Kelnhofer, president, and CEO of Return on Ingredients LLC. Mark is an international speaker and author on recipe costing and menu engineering. In addition, he has more than 25 years of experience in the bottom line, boosting accounting. After graduating from Ohio Dominican University with his undergraduate degree, he immediately entered the manufacturing Academy. He spent eight years in various industries, including plastic injection molding, lighting equipment, transit buses, and tire repair products. Mark incorporates his extensive background throughout the episode as he discusses his entrepreneurial mindset.

Mark talks about cost structure and what it entails in a restaurant business—giving practical examples from his brush with the restaurant industry. His ability to make the lessons he has gotten from the diverse industries that he has been in and put them all in his company Return on Ingredients LLC.

In the restaurant industry, different things can lead to cost implications, and a lack of instructions on cost controls can significantly improve efficiency and measure waste and profit. The data being gathered daily helps an organization respond to a situation not only then but also on how to respond to the problem quickly. You may have the mechanism in place, but if you do not understand how to make proper decisions, you can easily create a wrong decision.

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S5E32: Way Off Base: The Death of Ego in Modern Leadership with Peter Margaritis

“The collective knowledge outside your office far exceeds the collective knowledge inside your office.” Peter Margaritis

We all have an ego. Some egos are underdeveloped, others are well developed, and yet others are overdeveloped. Overdeveloped egos can, in some cases, ultimately transform into full-blown narcissism. Conversely, when a person’s ego becomes overdeveloped, they can begin to operate from the perspective that the world revolves around them.

More often than not, narcissistic leaders stop listening to those around them, which ends up creating toxic cultures. CEOs who make everything about them and disregard the advice from their teams are doomed for failure. Listening to understand is one of the critical components of leadership, yet it’s just on the side because of an overdeveloped ego.

Leaders who lead with an improv leadership style have a foundation of respect, trust, and support for their organization and people. These leaders know how to suspend their judgment, be active listeners, and be present and adaptable. They also believe and ultimately understand that leadership is the positive effect you have on another person. In improv leadership, you praise a teammate in public and only criticize them when appropriate and in private.

S5E25: Tips and Techniques on Becoming a Better Salesperson with Lon Graham

“To get what you want as a sales professional, you have to connect with the person who has it, and that person is your client.” Lon Graham

My guest is Lon Graham, who’s a speaker coaching advocate. Lon speaks to sales teams, coaches, and sales leaders and is an advocate for sales professionals. He is also an award-winning sales and leadership professional. His message of getting the sales you want comes from over 25 years of experience in healthcare, corporate programs, events, and the airline industry. Lon is an active member of the National Speakers Association.

Sales are complex, and two statistics prove that. The first statistic is that sales have the highest turnover; a third of the sales force leaves yearly, which is 10 points higher than any other profession. The second statistic is that the average tenure of a sales professional is a year and a half.

There is transformational power in being nice to people. If you start by being nice to people, talking to them, and spending a little bit of time getting to know them, they will be more inclined to want to talk to you, and then they will give you a chance to come back.

The four C’s is a framework designed to get people to become better at sales. The first C is Choice which addresses how to choose what you want. The following C is Commit, which addresses the steps to take for you to progress towards that goal. The third C is Connect which is about knowing who to connect with. Finally, the fourth C is celebrating, which is about recognizing the progress that you’ve made and acknowledging wins.

To get what you want as a sales professional, you have to connect with the person who has it; that person is your client. What makes sales so hard is how to connect with your client. The starting point is meeting your client in their story and understanding what they’re doing and what they’re dealing with so that you can provide solutions to their challenges. When you do that, they’re going to connect with you, and they’re going to help you get what you want. The four Cs framework is shaped like a wheel because it’s progressive.

The two things that are so important for sales professionals to learn are first, what your client or potential client does best, and their productivity. The second thing is knowing your ideal client. By knowing these two things, you have an insight into how that potential client thinks, and if you can contribute to them doing more of what they want to do with who their ideal client is, you’ve just made them more productive and more profitable.

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