S6E1: Milk Carton Musings and Leadership with Nick Lozano

“As much as we need technical skills in the business world, soft skills are even more important.” Nick Lozano

Today’s guest is Nick Lozano who is a technology professional who has a love for digital media. He co-hosts a podcast called >Lead.exe, which is for anyone who wants to level up their leadership skills and enhance their careers. ​ As someone in Tech, you need soft skills because you will have to sell yourself and the business to your clients and potential prospects. So much as we need technical skills in the business world, softer skills are even more critical.

During the initial talks about Tech, Nick brings about the analogy of building a house; you can make it as high as you need to go, as big as you want, or it can be a simple one-room house and still be great. The complex sides of technology can be a headache, especially for someone outside the industry. Nick’s soft skills make it easier to understand the technical side of technology in a fun way.

The audience you present to will determine how you will do your presentation for your message to go through. This is even more so when you have a paid sponsorship and must make the audience get the news across. Sometimes being simple and precise works better than using jargon.

Making mistakes is part of the process, and I know there is room for failure, but the lowest point is if you fail once, learn from it; this is how you gain experience. The downside is that if you are making mistakes and you aren’t learning from them, you are wasting your time and energy. Be prepared for how you will receive feedback, which will broaden your perspective on issues. All feedback is there to build you; the good and the bad appreciate everyone who will give it to you.

Nick humorously shares his story and experiences making this a unique and fantastic interview to begin the year.

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S5E51: Take a Load Off: Stress Relievers for Overwrought Leaders (Part 2)

“Yes…but, Yes…and, the first disrupts the thoughts flowing while the latter connects an idea already forming.” Peter Margaritis

In today’s episode, Peter Margaritis continues his series on: Take a Load Off: Stress relievers for overwrought leaders. Peter shows how Business Improv is a tool that all leaders need to master to learn how to overcome pressures that come from business.

Awareness is one way that can help you develop confidence and help you overcome stress. Being aware of your environment can help you control your involvement in any situation, enabling you to manage and control your reactions to different triggers.

Being prepared in any circumstance adds a layer of confidence. You may not be able to foresee the unexpected, but you can be ready for the curves that may come your way. Without being prepared, in most cases, you are more concerned about anxieties and the stress of not binge prepared.

As Peter shares with us the rest of the tools he believes can help manage stress for leaders, he gives fantastic examples of different stages that help drive the points home.

S5E49: Unscripted Give and Take: Using Business Improv to Resolve Disputes and Negotiate Deals (Part 2)

“Negotiation is not a fight but a collaboration. Prepare more than memorize.” Peter Margaritis

In today’s episode, Peter Margaritis continues his on Unscripted Give-and-Take and how to use Business Improv to resolve disputes and negotiate deals. Going for an all-in approach is not an excellent way to begin a business with someone you are trying to build a relationship with.

You have the tools you need to have a win-win outcome in a negotiation. The beginning of every conversation is a smile that disarms the other party. Your smile needs to be genuine. You may not get everything you need, but you will get the chance for future business opportunities.

Humanizing the conversation during negotiation creates an atmosphere of calm and respect so that both parties can feel comfortable no matter the outcome. Do not manipulate the other party to get them to make your point. You can show them the benefits of what you are telling them to their goals and agenda, which makes the relationship last longer.

Preparedness during negotiation is better than memorizing facts and figures for that table. Adapt to the changing moods and turns at the table, and do not follow a written-in-stone script; you will fail.

S5E44: Turned Off – Walking Away From Your Inner Critic (Part 2)

“Your ability to be vulnerable is your strength, not your weakness.” Peter Margaritis

In today’s episode, Peter Margaritis continues discussing the inner critic. We can learn how to turn off the inner critic, but they are not always so bad. The only people who know that you have done a flop are you, your inner critic, and nobody else.

As we continue to silence the inner critic, sometimes we are so focused on what went wrong that we forget that we are human beings and are allowed to make mistakes. Instead of focusing on yourself, it’s more important to focus on your audience and to whom you deliver.

Vulnerability can be a great way to connect to others. Giving examples from a fantastic songwriter, Peter gives excellent insight on how opening yourself up to others can make you a better connection and relatable, especially in the message you want to deliver.

Sometimes you need to reason with your inner critic instead of silencing them.

S5E43: Turned Off – Walking Away From Your Inner Critic (Part 1)

“Your inner critic wants to protect you by holding you back.” Peter Margaritis

In today’s episode, Peter Margaritis talks about turning off the inner critic in yourself. Sometimes it’s hard to quiet that voice that makes you not want to take risks. But, it gives you advice, usually in the negative kind, that holds you in your comfort zone.

Peter gives insight into the inner critic and why the critic comes out. Sometimes it’s because of self-preservation, but most times, the critic has no basis for criticizing. As Peter puts it, the inner critic is a good companion, but you shouldn’t let them control you.

Quieting the inner critic may seem like a hurdle, but once you do, you will have a better time at work, during meetings, and going on stage.